1. China slaps ‘distressing’ duties of up to 212 per cent on Australian wine  South China Morning Post
  2. Virus, spies and wine: Australia-China relations in freefall  Free Malaysia Today
  3. China imposes swingeing tariffs on Australian wine in 'devastating blow' to exporters  The Guardian
  4. One Nation's Pauline Hanson urges Australians to boycott Chinese products this Christmas  Daily Mail
  5. China import duties wipe 11 per cent off share price of Penfolds label owner  South China Morning Post
  6. View Full coverage on Google News

As political tensions rise between Canberra and Beijing, China has been blocking wide range of Australian imports.As political tensions rise between Canberra and Beijing, China has been blocking wide range of Australian imports.

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Trade minister Simon Birmingham says the penalties for alleged dumping make the market unviable for Australian exportersTrade minister Simon Birmingham says the penalties for alleged dumping make the market unviable for Australian exporters

China imposes swingeing tariffs on Australian wine in 'devastating blow' to exporters | International trade | The Guardian

China’s move to slap tariffs on Australian wine makers after an anti-dumping investigation will kill off the industry, Trade Minister Simon Birmingham has warned. China’s move to slap tariffs on Australian wine makers after an anti-dumping investigation will kill off the industry, Trade Minister Simon Birmingham has warned.

China hits Australian wine industry

SYDNEY, Nov 27 — Australia will move to protect its multi-billion-dollar wine industry from punitive new Chinese tariffs, its agriculture minister said today, raising the threat of World Trade Organisation counter-measures. “The Australian government will vigorously defend the industry,”...SYDNEY, Nov 27 — Australia will move to protect its multi-billion-dollar wine industry from punitive new Chinese tariffs, its agriculture minister said today, raising the threat of World Trade Organisation counter-measures. “The Australian government will vigorously defend the industry,”...

Minister: Australia to ‘vigorously defend’ wine industry from China tariffs | Money | Malay Mail

BEIJING: China on Friday said it would impose anti-dumping measures on Australian wine, in a further ramping up of tensions between Beijing and Canberra.BEIJING: China on Friday said it would impose anti-dumping measures on Australian wine, in a further ramping up of tensions between Beijing and Canberra.

China ramps up row, imposes high taxes on Australian wine

One Nation Senator Pauline Hanson called for Australians to boycott Chinese-made products after the country dealt devastating trade blows on Australia's wine industries.One Nation Senator Pauline Hanson called for Australians to boycott Chinese-made products after the country dealt devastating trade blows on Australia's wine industries.

One Nation's Pauline Hanson urges Australians to boycott Chinese products this Christmas | Daily Mail Online

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China looks set to impose enormous tariffs, in excess of 200%, on imports of Australian wine in a move which Australia’s trade minister said makes the market “unviable” for the country’s wines.

China tariffs make market ‘unviable’ for Australian wine

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BEIJING/SYDNEY (Reuters) -- Australia has responded defiantly to China imposing anti-dumping tariffs on Australian wine, saying the "seriously concernCanberra says Beijing is settling diplomatic grievances by punishing winemakers

China to impose anti-dumping measures on Australian wine - Nikkei Asia

Beijing slaps up to 212% tariffs on Australian wine in response to price-dumpingBeijing slaps up to 212% tariffs on Australian wine in response to price-dumping

Beijing slaps up to 212% tariffs on Australian wine in response to price-dumping — RT Business News

China imposes anti-dumping duties on Australian wine - CGTN

China’s official denials of growing military capability in the region look a lot like gaslighting.China’s official denials of growing military capability in the region look a lot like gaslighting.

Beijing’s line on the South China Sea: “Nothing to see here”

 The anti-dumping duties will take effect Nov 28 (Saturday) and range from 107.1 per cent to 212.1 per cent.. Read more at straitstimes.com.East Asia News - The anti-dumping duties will take effect Nov 28 (Saturday) and range from 107.1 per cent to 212.1 per cent.. Read more at straitstimes.com.

China to impose anti-dumping duties on Australian wine; minister says might appeal to WTO, East Asia News & Top Stories - The Straits Times

27 Nov 2020 - After opening modestly lower, the ASX200 lost ground throughout the day to close 0.5 per cent lower. All of the sectors ended in the red, except Real Estate Investment Trusts. Australia’s wine industry was dealt a blow today. The Chinese Government announced new tariffs-like deposits of up to 200 per cent on all Australian wine imports from tomorrow. Treasury Wine Estates (ASX:TWE) requested a trading halt this afternoon after its shares plunged on the back of this decision.

Chinese tariffs threaten to drown Australian wine exports: Aus shares up 0.9% over week | Finance News Network

Winemakers face tariffs of up to 200 per cent after Chinese trade officials ruled Australian producers had been dumping product, in a further escalation of tensions between the two countries.Winemakers face tariffs of up to 200 per cent after Chinese trade officials ruled Australian producers had been dumping product, in a further escalation of tensions between the two countries.

Australian Financial Review

From Saturday, Australian wine going into the Chinese market will face tariffs of between 107 and 212 per cent. From Saturday, Australian wine going into the Chinese market will face tariffs of between 107 and 212 per cent.

'Seriously concerning': China imposes anti-dumping measures on Australian wine as trade tensions escalate | SBS News

BEIJING (AP) — China is raising import taxes on Australian wine, stepping up pressure on Australia over disputes including its support for a probe into the origin of the coronavirus. The... BEIJING (AP) — China is raising import taxes on Australian wine, stepping up pressure on Australia over disputes including its support for a probe into the origin of the coronavirus. The...

Penfolds maker Treasury Wine Estates faces turmoil in its largest export market after Chinese regulators announced a sudden 169.3 per cent tariff on its exportsPenfolds maker Treasury Wine Estates faces turmoil in its largest export market after Chinese regulators announced a sudden 169.3 per cent tariff on its exports

[BENGALURU] Australia shares ended lower on Friday as renewed doubts about a promising coronavirus vaccine dented investor sentiment, while Treasury Wine dived on China's plans to impose temporary anti-dumping measures on Australian wine imports. Read more at The Business Times.[BENGALURU] Australia shares ended lower on Friday as renewed doubts about a promising coronavirus vaccine dented investor sentiment, while Treasury Wine dived on China's plans to impose temporary

Australia: Shares end lower as vaccine doubts weigh, Stocks - THE BUSINESS TIMES

The trade strike is the latest in a long line of hits on Australian exports by Beijing this year.The trade strike is the latest in a long line of hits on Australian exports by Beijing this year.

The Australian government has expressed "extreme disappointment" with China's decision to impose new tariffs of up to 200 per cent on Australian wine, in a re-escalation of trade tensions. "Today's decision is a seriously concerning development and one which Australia will be vigorously fighting against," a government statement said. "The Australian government categorically rejects any allegation that our wine producers are dumping product into China, and we continue to believe there is no basis or any evidence for these claims."The Australian government has expressed "extreme disappointment" with China's decision to impose new tariffs of up to 200 per cent on Australian wine, in a re-escalation of trade tensions. "Today's decision is a seriously concerning development and one which Australia will be vigorously fighting against," a government statement said. "The Australian government categorically rejects any allegation that our wine producers are dumping product into China, and we continue to believe there is no basis or any evidence for these claims."

China is set to impose duties on Australian wine of between 107 and 212 per cent from tomorrow following an "anti-dumping" inquiry announced as part of a suite of measures in past months targeting Australian exports.China is set to impose duties on Australian wine of between 107 and 212 per cent from tomorrow following an \"anti-dumping\" inquiry announced as part of a suite of measures in past months targeting Australian exports.

China announces it will slap big tariffs on Australian wine - InDaily

The Chinese Government has announced it will place tariffs on all Australian wine imports from tomorrow, striking a blow to the billion-dollar industry.The Chinese Government has announced it will place tariffs on all Australian wine imports from tomorrow, striking a blow to the billion-dollar industry.

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China has imposed massive tariffs on Australian wine in an anti-dumping measure that will have a dramatic i...

China announces massive new tariffs on Australian wine

China has released the findings into its investigation of a key Australian industry and resolved to hit it with a crushing new penalty.China has released the findings into its investigation of a key Australian industry and resolved to hit it with a crushing new penalty.

Perth Now

China is set to impose significant anti-dumping duties on Australian wine from Saturday. The Chinese Ministry of Commerce has determined that Australian expor...China is set to impose significant anti-dumping duties on Australian wine from Saturday. The Chinese Ministry of Commerce has determined that Australian expor...

China to impose duties on Australian wine | Moree Champion | Moree, NSW

Hugh White takes CCP talking points to The Economist - MacroBusiness

NoCookies | The Australian

The Treasury Wine Estates share price plunged after the Chinese Ministry of Commerce announced aggressive duties on Australian wine imports on Friday.The Treasury Wine Estates share price plunged after the Chinese Ministry of Commerce announced aggressive duties on Australian wine imports on Friday.

Treasury Wine Estates share price collapses on 212% tariff hike | IG AU

The Treasury Wine Estates Ltd (ASX:TWE) share price is crashing lower on Friday after China announced tariffs on Australian wines...The Treasury Wine Estates Ltd (ASX:TWE) share price is crashing lower on Friday after China announced tariffs on Australian wines...

Treasury Wine (ASX:TWE) share price crashes 11% lower on China tariff news

Agriculture minister suggests move was politically motivated and vows to appeal the rulingAgriculture minister suggests move was politically motivated and vows to appeal the ruling

Australia to 'vigorously defend' wine industry from new Chinese tariffs as spat grows

David Littleproud called for talks with China – although minister-level contacts have dried up in recent months – but said Australia could also turn to the WTO for help.David Littleproud called for talks with China – although minister-level contacts have dried up in recent months – but said Australia could also turn to the WTO for help.

Australia to 'vigorously defend' wine industry from China tariffs: Minister - Business - The Jakarta Post

(Bloomberg) -- Supply Lines is a daily newsletter that tracks Covid-19’s impact on trade. Sign up here, and subscribe to our Covid-19 podcast for the latest news and analysis on the pandemic.China is set to impose anti-dumping duties of more than 100% on Australian wine from this weekend, adding to a series of sweeping trade reprisals this year and further escalating tensions with Canberra.The anti-dumping deposits will take effect Nov. 28 and range from 107.1% to 212.1%, the Chinese Ministry of Commerce said in a statement Friday. Australia responded by warning Beijing that its actions could create a perception among businesses and countries around the world that trade with China is risky.The duties come just three months after China started an investigation into Australian wine, and follows a raft of other measures barring imports from coal to copper to barley this year. China is the biggest buyer of Australian wine, importing A$1.2 billion ($880 million) in the year through September, according to government marketing body Wine Australia. That’s 167% more than the value of exports to its next biggest market, the U.S.China on Friday repeated that it had “taken measures on imported products in accordance with the law.”“Certain people in Australia have clung to a Cold War mentality and ideological biases,” Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Zhao Lijian told a briefing in Beijing. “They have taken China’s development as a threat and taken a series of erroneous deeds and words. This is the reason why China and Australian relations have taken a nosedive and are now stuck in the current difficult situation.”In response to China’s announcement, Australia said it would seek WTO intervention to defend itself from the tariffs, which Trade Minister Simon Birmingham labeled “grossly unfair, unwarranted, unjustified.”Businesses and countries outside of China viewing Beijing’s backlash against Australia this year would see the “potential that their trade, their businesses, can be disrupted through these sort of unwarranted, unsanctioned actions that frankly don’t stand up,” Birmingham told reporters in Adelaide.Treasury Wine Estates shares tumbled more than 11% after the news, before trading was paused. The company said it’s reviewing details of the provisional measures “as a matter of urgency” in order to update the market. Subsidiary Treasury Wine Estates Vintners is subject to duties as high as 169.3%, according to the Chinese commerce ministry’s statement.Tony Battaglene, head of industry group Australian Grape and Wine, said he plans to respond to the Chinese commerce ministry in the next 10 days. “There must be rationale behind the various tariff rates that were put on so we just have to work through those arguments,” he said.The two nations have been in a deadlock since 2018, when Canberra barred Huawei Technologies Co. from building its 5G network. Adding to grievances is Prime Minister Scott Morrison’s call for an inquiry into the origins of the coronavirus outbreak, a move that bruised China’s pride and unleashed a torrent of criticism that Australia is a puppet of the U.S.Read: Standing Up to China Comes at a High Price for Australia“This latest hit by the Chinese government shows Beijing is determined to teach Australia a lesson that can reverberate globally,” said John Blaxland, a former intelligence officer who’s now a professor in international security at the Australian National University. “While it’s important for Australia not to cave into this pressure, it also shows how the nation’s traders have no option but to quickly recalibrate and diversify their markets.”Morrison sought this week to release some of the pressure, giving a speech that praised China for pulling its people out of poverty. Australia, he said, wants a “mutually beneficial” relationship and insisted his government isn’t siding with the U.S. to contain China. The Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Beijing noted the “positive comments.”“Beijing is saying that Scott Morrison’s speech this past week was simply not enough, and so China wants to keep the trade pressure on,” said James Laurenceson, director of the Australia-China Relations Institute at the University of Technology Sydney.Since the ruling applies to wine shipped to China in containers of as much as two liters, Australian exporters could potentially circumvent the duties by shipping bulk wine to the country and have it bottled there, Laurenceson added, noting that he expected “a good proportion” of the product that the country used to send to China to be sold elsewhere within a year or two.Australia is the world’s most China-dependent developed economy, and the trade issues hit the country in the midst of its first recession in almost 30 years. China won’t be able to import products including coal, barley, copper ore and concentrate, sugar, timber, wine and lobster, people familiar with the situation said earlier this month.Australian wine has already been piling up in the country after China announced two trade probes earlier this year. More than 50 vessels carrying at least $500 million in Australian coal have also been stranded near Chinese ports as the diplomatic spat cut into trade.(Updates with China comment from fourth paragraph.)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.(Bloomberg) -- Supply Lines is a daily newsletter that tracks Covid-19’s impact on trade. Sign up here, and subscribe to our Covid-19 podcast for the latest news and analysis on the pandemic.China is set to impose anti-dumping duties of more than 100% on Australian wine from this weekend, adding to a series of sweeping trade reprisals this year and further escalating tensions with Canberra.The anti-dumping deposits will take effect Nov. 28 and range from 107.1% to 212.1%, the Chinese Ministry of Commerce said in a statement Friday. Australia responded by warning Beijing that its actions could create a perception among businesses and countries around the world that trade with China is risky.The duties come just three months after China started an investigation into Australian wine, and follows a raft of other measures barring imports from coal to copper to barley this year. China is the biggest buyer of Australian wine, importing A$1.2 billion ($880 million) in the year through September, according to government marketing body Wine Australia. That’s 167% more than the value of exports to its next biggest market, the U.S.China on Friday repeated that it had “taken measures on imported products in accordance with the law.”“Certain people in Australia have clung to a Cold War mentality and ideological biases,” Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Zhao Lijian told a briefing in Beijing. “They have taken China’s development as a threat and taken a series of erroneous deeds and words. This is the reason why China and Australian relations have taken a nosedive and are now stuck in the current difficult situation.”In response to China’s announcement, Australia said it would seek WTO intervention to defend itself from the tariffs, which Trade Minister Simon Birmingham labeled “grossly unfair, unwarranted, unjustified.”Businesses and countries outside of China viewing Beijing’s backlash against Australia this year would see the “potential that their trade, their businesses, can be disrupted through these sort of unwarranted, unsanctioned actions that frankly don’t stand up,” Birmingham told reporters in Adelaide.Treasury Wine Estates shares tumbled more than 11% after the news, before trading was paused. The company said it’s reviewing details of the provisional measures “as a matter of urgency” in order to update the market. Subsidiary Treasury Wine Estates Vintners is subject to duties as high as 169.3%, according to the Chinese commerce ministry’s statement.Tony Battaglene, head of industry group Australian Grape and Wine, said he plans to respond to the Chinese commerce ministry in the next 10 days. “There must be rationale behind the various tariff rates that were put on so we just have to work through those arguments,” he said.The two nations have been in a deadlock since 2018, when Canberra barred Huawei Technologies Co. from building its 5G network. Adding to grievances is Prime Minister Scott Morrison’s call for an inquiry into the origins of the coronavirus outbreak, a move that bruised China’s pride and unleashed a torrent of criticism that Australia is a puppet of the U.S.Read: Standing Up to China Comes at a High Price for Australia“This latest hit by the Chinese government shows Beijing is determined to teach Australia a lesson that can reverberate globally,” said John Blaxland, a former intelligence officer who’s now a professor in international security at the Australian National University. “While it’s important for Australia not to cave into this pressure, it also shows how the nation’s traders have no option but to quickly recalibrate and diversify their markets.”Morrison sought this week to release some of the pressure, giving a speech that praised China for pulling its people out of poverty. Australia, he said, wants a “mutually beneficial” relationship and insisted his government isn’t siding with the U.S. to contain China. The Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Beijing noted the “positive comments.”“Beijing is saying that Scott Morrison’s speech this past week was simply not enough, and so China wants to keep the trade pressure on,” said James Laurenceson, director of the Australia-China Relations Institute at the University of Technology Sydney.Since the ruling applies to wine shipped to China in containers of as much as two liters, Australian exporters could potentially circumvent the duties by shipping bulk wine to the country and have it bottled there, Laurenceson added, noting that he expected “a good proportion” of the product that the country used to send to China to be sold elsewhere within a year or two.Australia is the world’s most China-dependent developed economy, and the trade issues hit the country in the midst of its first recession in almost 30 years. China won’t be able to import products including coal, barley, copper ore and concentrate, sugar, timber, wine and lobster, people familiar with the situation said earlier this month.Australian wine has already been piling up in the country after China announced two trade probes earlier this year. More than 50 vessels carrying at least $500 million in Australian coal have also been stranded near Chinese ports as the diplomatic spat cut into trade.(Updates with China comment from fourth paragraph.)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

China Targets Australian Wine, Says Ties Have Taken ‘Nosedive’

China on Friday said it would impose anti-dumping measures on Australian wine, in a further ramping up of tensions between Beijing and Canberra. ImportersChina on Friday said it would impose anti-dumping measures on Australian wine, in a further ramping up of tensions between Beijing and Canberra. Importers of Australian wine will have to pay deposi…

China slaps anti-dumping levies on Australian wine - Asia Times