1. Coronavirus: Care home window visits bringing 'tears and loneliness'  BBC News
  2. COVID-19 infection creates immunity for at least six months: study  Times of India
  3. 'I just could not breathe': Young ER doctor details his fight against COVID-19  KMBC Kansas City
  4. COVID-19 reinfection unlikely for at least 6 months, study finds | Daily Sabah  Daily Sabah
  5. View Full coverage on Google News
As care homes struggle to keep Covid-19 out, relatives protest at Stormont over visiting loved ones.As care homes struggle to keep Covid-19 out, relatives protest at Stormont over visiting loved ones.

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Isolated cases of re-infection with COVID-19 has raised concern that that immunity might be short-lived, but study results suggest reinfection cases remain rare.Isolated cases of re-infection with COVID-19 has raised concern that that immunity might be short-lived, but study results suggest reinfection cases remain rare.

COVID-19 reinfection unlikely for at least 6 months, study finds - The Jerusalem Post

People who are infected wiht the new coronavirus are “highly unlikely” to get sick again for at least six months, according to a...People who are infected wiht the new coronavirus are “highly unlikely” to get sick again for at least six months, according to a new Oxford study. Researchers say the findings are “...

Study shows AstraZeneca-Oxford vaccine gives just six months' protection | The Standard

David Burkard is a young man, a runner who eats a healthy diet. He thought if he contracted COVID-19 he would likely recover easily. Days after testing positive, he found himself struggling to breathe.David Burkard is a young man, a runner who eats a healthy diet. He thought if he contracted COVID-19 he would likely recover easily. Days after testing positive, he found himself struggling to breathe.

'I just could not breathe': Young ER doctor details his fight against COVID-19

HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) - Connecticut is reopening health care centers dedicated solely to treating COVID-19 patients amid a resurgence of the coronavirus across the state, including in nursing homes and assisted living facilities, a state Department of Public Health spokesperson said Friday. A coronavirus "recovery center" in Meriden reopened last week to serve up to 30 patients and there are now plans to reopen one in Torrington with another 30 beds in the near future, department spokesperson Av Harris said. The two facilities were among several around the state that opened earlier in the pandemic but later closed as virus rates dropped over the summer. The reopenings come as Connecticut on Friday surpassed 100,000 positive coronavirus tests since the pandemic began, and as public and private schools saw a 70% increase in positive student tests compared with last week. Two other centers in East Hartford and Wallingford have remained open during the pandemic. They're designed to treat COVID-19 patients discharged from the hospital before they return to nursing homes and other locations. "This helps those nursing homes manage their COVID-19 outbreaks through infection control measures such as cohorting their residents appropriately and offering maximum protection to those residents who are COVID negative," Harris said in an email to The Associated Press. Harris also said the centers help free up hospital beds by caring for patients who no longer need acute care. He added that Connecticut hospitals currently have adequate space to treat COVID-19 patients. The facility in Meriden, at the former Westfield Care and Rehabilitation Center, had already exceeded its initial capacity of 30 by one patient on Friday and set up another 30 beds because of increasing infections, said Tim Brown, marketing and...

COVID-19 care centers reopening amid nursing home outbreaks - Trumbull Times

When COVID-19 tore through Donald Wallace’s nursing home, he was one of the lucky few to avoid infection. He died a horrible death anyway. Hale and happyWhen COVID-19 tore through Donald Wallace’s nursing home, he was one of the lucky few to avoid infection. He died a horrible death anyway. Hale and happy

AP story on nursing home neglect includes Hendersonville woman | WMOT

New increases appear to be driven by infections in younger people, the Office for National Statistics said.New increases appear to be driven by infections in younger people, the Office for National Statistics said.

Substantial regional differences in Covid-19 infections across England, says ONS | Penarth Times

We have learned — at the cost of tens of thousands of possibly preventable deaths — that COVID-19 finds nursing homes to be good hunting grounds. At one timWe have learned — at the cost of tens of thousands of possibly preventable deaths — that COVID-19 finds nursing homes to be good hunting grounds. At one time earlier in the epidemic, more than half the nation’s deaths from the disease in many state were among residents of long-term care facilities. Extraordinary steps taken […]

COVID-19 and nursing homes | News, Sports, Jobs - The Journal

The speedy development of COVID-19 vaccines by Pfizer, Moderna and other drugmakers is raising hopes of stopping the pandemic, which has killed more than 250,000 people in the U.S. so far this year. But as the coronavirus continues to spread, some experts worry that the plan to inoculate some of the most vulnerable Americans — those living in […]The speedy development of COVID-19 vaccines by Pfizer, Moderna and other drugmakers is raising hopes of stopping the pandemic, which has killed more than 250,000 people in the U.S. s…

The U.S. has plan to vaccinate nursing home residents. Experts fear it won’t work. | WLNS 6 News

When COVID-19 tore through Donald Wallace’s nursing home, he was one of the lucky few to avoid infection. He died a horrible death anyway. Hale and happy When COVID-19 tore through Donald Wallace’s nursing home, he was one of the lucky few to avoid infection. He died a horrible death anyway. Hale and happy before the pandemic, the 75-year-old retired Alabama truck driver became so malnourished and dehydrated that he dropped to 98 pounds and looked to his son like he’d been […]

Not just COVID: Nursing home neglect deaths surge in shadows | News, Sports, Jobs - The Express

By MATTHEW MOSK, LAURA ROMERO, and HALLEY FREGER, ABC News(WASHINGTON) — As coronavirus rates surge across the nation, the Trump administration issued new recommendations this week urging residents and staff of nursing homes to avoid contact with relatives during the upcoming holiday season – a dark reminder of the threat now bearing down on seniors [...]

As COVID cases surge in nursing homes, feds urge extra holiday precaution | KTIC Radio

By Emilio Parodi MILAN (Reuters) - The authors of a study showing that the new coronavirus was circulating in Italy earlier than experts had previously believed said on Thursday their data did not dispute the origins of COVID-19 as they defended the accuracy of their findings. The Italian researchers' findings showed that 11.6% of 959 healthy volunteers enrolled in a lung cancer screening trial between September 2019 and March 2020 had developed coronavirus antibodies well before February. If those findings are correct, scientists said it could change the history of the origin of pandemic, raising questions about when and where the virus first emerged. The novel coronavirus was first identified in the central Chinese city of Wuhan in December. Italy's first COVID-19 patient was detected on Feb. 21 in a small town near Milan, in the northern region of Lombardy. The Chinese government said on Tuesday it believed the study showed that tracing the origin of the virus was an ongoing process that may involve many countries. But the Italian researchers said that's not necessarily their conclusion. These findings simply document that the epidemic in China was not detected in time, Giovanni Apolone, scientific director of National Cancer Institute (INT) and a co-author of the study, told a news conference in Milan. The study has also sparked doubts among some Western scientists who called for further tests. Much of the scepticism was focused on the so-called specificity of the antibody tests, that, if not perfect, might reveal the presence of antibodies to other diseases. Emanuele Montomoli, co-author of the study and professor of preventive medicine at the University of Siena, defended the accuracy of the research, saying the tests identified the antibodies by targeting a part of the spike protein called the receptor binding domain (RBD), which is specific to the new coronavirus. Subsequently the serum samples were also tested on four different types of coronavirus circulating at that time in Europe and the USA and there were no cross reactions, the scientist told the news conference. Some scientists also questioned how there could be such a high percentage of samples with COVID-19 antibodies when the virus had been detected in only 2.5% of the Italian population by the National Institute of Statistics (Istat) last spring. Another author of the study said that the two sets of data were not comparable. Our study does not suggest at all that 11% of Italians had COVID antibodies in September-October, said Gabriella Sozzi, Director of Genomics Cancer at INT. These were 959 healthy volunteers, heavy smokers or ex-smokers between 55 and 65 years old, mostly males, not a representative sample of Italians, she added. (Reporting by Emilio Parodi; Editing by Josephine Mason and Bernadette Baum)By Emilio Parodi MILAN (Reuters) - The authors of a study showing that the new coronavirus was circulating in Italy earlier than experts had previously believed said on Thursday their data did not dispute the origins of COVID-19 as they defended the accuracy of their findings. The Italian researchers' findings showed that 11.6% of 959 healthy volunteers enrolled in a lung cancer screening trial between September 2019 and March 2020 had developed coronavirus antibodies well before February. If those findings are correct, scientists said it could change the history of the origin of pandemic, raising questions about when and where the virus first emerged. The novel coronavirus was first identified in the central Chinese city of Wuhan in December. Italy's first COVID-19 patient was detected on Feb. 21 in a small town near Milan, in the northern region of Lombardy. The Chinese government said on Tuesday it believed the study showed that tracing the origin of the virus was an ongoing process that may involve many countries. But the Italian researchers said that's not necessarily their conclusion. "These findings simply document that the epidemic in China was not detected in time," Giovanni Apolone, scientific director of National Cancer Institute (INT) and a co-author of the study, told a news conference in Milan. The study has also sparked doubts among some Western scientists who called for further tests. Much of the scepticism was focused on the so-called specificity of the antibody tests, that, if not perfect, might reveal the presence of antibodies to other diseases. Emanuele Montomoli, co-author of the study and professor of preventive medicine at the University of Siena, defended the accuracy of the research, saying the tests identified the antibodies by targeting a part of the spike protein called the receptor binding domain (RBD), which is specific to the new coronavirus. "Subsequently the serum samples were also tested on four different types of coronavirus circulating at that time in Europe and the USA and there were no cross reactions," the scientist told the news conference. Some scientists also questioned how there could be such a high percentage of samples with COVID-19 antibodies when the virus had been detected in only 2.5% of the Italian population by the National Institute of Statistics (Istat) last spring. Another author of the study said that the two sets of data were not comparable. "Our study does not suggest at all that 11% of Italians had COVID antibodies in September-October," said Gabriella Sozzi, Director of Genomics Cancer at INT. "These were 959 healthy volunteers, heavy smokers or ex-smokers between 55 and 65 years old, mostly males, not a representative sample of Italians," she added. (Reporting by Emilio Parodi; Editing by Josephine Mason and Bernadette Baum)

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