1. Forcing smiles at work linked to more after-hours drinking, study finds  Boston 25 News
  2. Faking smiles at work could lead some employees to heavy drinking, a new study says  Daily Mail
  3. Employees who force smiles for customers at work 'at risk of heavier drinking'  The Independent
  4. Forcing a smile at work linked to heavy drinking: study  Fox News
  5. Study: Forcing a smile at work may turn you into a heavier drinker off the clock  WHNT News 19
  6. View full coverage on Google News
We’ve all forced a smile or two in front of clients, customers or co-workers. But according to new research from Penn State and the University at Buffalo, people who regularly fake positive...We’ve all forced a smile or two in front of clients, customers or co-workers. But according to new research from Penn State and the University at Buffalo, people who regularly fake positive emotions or suppress negative emotions may be at risk for heavier drinking after work.

Forcing smiles at work linked to more after-hours drinking, study finds | Boston 25 News

A study published in March by researchers at Penn State and the University of Buffalo say they found a link between employees faking emotions at work with heavier drinking habits.A study published in March by researchers at Penn State and the University of Buffalo say they found a link between employees faking emotions at work with heavier drinking habits.

Faking smiles at work could lead some employees to heavy drinking, a new study says | Daily Mail Online

Forcing a smile when you’re unhappy is taxing at the best of times, but it’s even worse if it’s one of your job requirements. While a bit of chirpiness obviously goes a long way in every field, for those working in customer services, smiling can be a fundamental part of your role.Forcing a smile when you’re unhappy is taxing at the best of times, but it’s even worse if it’s one of your job requirements. While a bit of chirpiness obviously goes a long way in every field, for

Employees who force smiles for customers at work ‘at risk of heavier drinking’ | The Independent

Employees who force themselves to smile for customers or hide feelings of annoyance may be suseptable for heavy drinking after work, according to a new research study.Employees who force themselves to smile for customers or hide feelings of annoyance may be suseptable for heavy drinking after work, according to a new research study.

“Part II on that smile treat a while back: @penn_State study finds that employees who smile for customers at work more likely to drink heavily after work. https://t.co/upiaa8Kb6D”

Shari Rudavsky on Twitter: "Part II on that smile treat a while back: @penn_State study finds that employees who smile for customers at work more likely to drink heavily after work. https://t.co/upiaa8Kb6D"

“Forcing a smile at work may lead to heavier drinking, study says https://t.co/qR5EYHSEQz via @KGWNews”

Gillian Flaccus on Twitter: "Forcing a smile at work may lead to heavier drinking, study says https://t.co/qR5EYHSEQz via @KGWNews"

“New study suggests fake smiling at work increases drinking habits https://t.co/hAbuEQjKCQ”

Wendy Suares on Twitter: "New study suggests fake smiling at work increases drinking habits https://t.co/hAbuEQjKCQ"

“For all those lawmakers who keep telling me to smile................. Fake smiling at work may lead to heavier drinking, study finds https://t.co/83E4g2Sbdj #gapol”

Maya T. Prabhu on Twitter: "For all those lawmakers who keep telling me to smile................. Fake smiling at work may lead to heavier drinking, study finds https://t.co/83E4g2Sbdj #gapol"

Those who work with the public and force themselves to smile — or even avoid rolling their eyes — are more likely than others to drink heavily after they leave the office, according to a new study by Penn State and the University at BuffaloThose who work with the public and force themselves to smile — or even avoid rolling their eyes — are more likely than others to drink heavily after they leave the office, according to a new study

Faking a smile at work can lead to heavy drinking: study

Fake smiling at work may lead to more drinking during off-hours, claims new study.

Fake smiling at work may lead to more drinking during off-hours: study - Sun Sentinel

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. - If the smile you wear at work is plastered on for customers, you may be hitting the bottle harder than your happier coworkers, a new study from Penn State and the University of Buffalo said.UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. - If the smile you wear at work is plastered on for customers, you may be hitting the bottle harder than your happier coworkers, a new study from Penn State and the University of Buffalo said. The study focused on people who routinely work with the public, such as teachers, nurses and people in the food service industry.

Study: Forcing a smile at work may turn you into a heavier drinker off the clock | WHNT.com

We’ve all forced a smile or two in front of clients, customers or coworkers. But according to new research from Penn State and the University at Buffalo, people who regularly fake positive...We’ve all forced a smile or two in front of clients, customers or coworkers. But according to new research from Penn State and the University at Buffalo, people who regularly fake positive emotions or suppress negative emotions may be at risk for heavier drinking after work.

Forcing smiles at work linked to more after hours drinking, study finds | WSB-TV