1. Alzheimer's Diagnosis Improved By Brain Scans  Eurasia Review
  2. Dementia: Amyloid PET scans can improve diagnosis and care  Medical News Today
  3. A 'low dose aspirin' for dementia? Drug ready for first in-human testing  Medical Xpress
  4. Alzheimer’s disease may affect twice as many people as estimates suggest  Telegraph.co.uk
  5. A 'low dose aspirin' for dementia? Drug ready for first in-human testing  EurekAlert
  6. View full coverage on Google News
Using brain scans that can detect hallmarks of Alzheimer's could improve diagnosis and clinical care of people with dementia and mild cognitive impairment.Using brain scans that can detect hallmarks of Alzheimer's could improve diagnosis and clinical care of people with dementia and mild cognitive impairment.

Dementia: Amyloid PET scans can improve diagnosis and care

Alzheimer’s disease probably affects twice as many people as current estimates suggest but sufferers are yet to show symptoms, experts believe.Alzheimer’s disease probably affects twice as many people as current estimates suggest but sufferers are yet to show symptoms, experts believe.

Alzheimer’s disease may affect twice as many people as estimates suggest

Alzheimer's disease wreaks emotional havoc on patients, who are robbed of their memories, their dignity, and their lives. It's financially devastating as well: care for Alzheimer's patients is predicted ...

A 'low dose aspirin' for dementia? Drug ready for first in-human testing

To date, there have been very few successes in the pursuit of a treatment for Alzheimer's disease. But one drug that looks at AD from a different angle is now ready for its first round of testing in humans, supported by $5.5 million from the NIH and the ADDF.To date, there have been very few successes in the pursuit of a treatment for Alzheimer's disease. But one drug that looks at AD from a different angle is now ready for its first round of testing in humans, supported by $5.5 million from the NIH and the ADDF.

A 'low dose aspirin' for dementia? Drug ready for first in-human testing | EurekAlert! Science News

A first-of-its-kind national study has found that a form of brain imaging that detects Alzheimer's-related "plaques" significantly influenced clinical management of patients with mild cognitive impairment ...

Alzheimer's diagnosis, management improved by brain scans

Researchers release new study showing that, when doctors were able to definitively diagnose Alzheimer’s disease using brain scans, they changed their patients’ treatment in roughly two-thirds of the cases.Researchers release new study showing that, when doctors were able to definitively diagnose Alzheimer’s disease using brain scans, they changed their patients’ treatment in roughly two-thirds of the cases.

Brain scan ensures dementia patients get proper diagnosis | The Sacramento Bee

Alzheimer's disease probably affects twice as many people as current estimates suggest, experts believe, but sufferers are yet to show symptoms.Alzheimer's disease probably affects twice as many people as current estimates suggest, experts believe, but sufferers are yet to show symptoms.

Tell-tale signs of Alzheimer's 'in twice as many people as thought' - Independent.ie

The results “make it clear that amyloid PET imaging can have a major impact on how we diagnose and care for patients with Alzheimer's disease and other forms of cognitive decline,The results “make it clear that amyloid PET imaging can have a major impact on how we diagnose and care for patients with Alzheimer's disease and other forms of cognitive decline," said the study’s lead author.

Brain Scans Spot, Track Alzheimer's

National study has found that a form of brain imaging that detects Alzheimer’s-related “plaques” significantly influenced clinical management of patients with mild cognitive impairment and dementia.National study has found that a form of brain imaging that detects Alzheimer’s-related “plaques” significantly influenced clinical management of patients with mild cognitive impairment and dementia.

Alzheimer’s Diagnosis, Management Improved by Brain Scans | UC San Francisco